Tag: Spirituality

At the Crossroads

If you told me in the mid-1970s, when I first started exploring the ancient reverence for female deities, that less than a quarter of a century later there would be hundreds of thousands of people in the United States whose spiritual lives were Goddess-centered,[1]  I wouldn’t have believed you.

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“Goddess and God in the World: Conversations in Embodied Theology”, by Carol P. Christ and Judith Plaskow

Carol Christ and Judith Plaskow are foremothers of feminist theology who have shared a long friendship. Their insightful new book, Goddess and God  in the World: Conversations in Embodied Theology, begins with a history of feminist and general theology, continues with their life experiences that gave rise to their individual theologies, and ends with a conversation about their common beliefs and differences.

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Women’s Spirituality – Ushering in the Sacred Feminine

Because I’m a woman and my body has taught me this, I take the view that life on this planet moves in cycles. There are Lunar cycles, Solar cycles and cycles that take thousands of years. We have our own personal development cycles and we are also always involved with the collective cycle.In modern Western culture, I believe, we are at a stage in the present cycle where weare once again ushering in the Sacred Feminine. In a culture where spirituality (if it’s considered at all) is still only equated with masculine values, we are being asked to be the birth canal for Women’s Spirituality in this country.

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Matriarchal Spirituality, Past and Present

Non-patriarchal societies have different social structures than patriarchal ones; these structures distinguished by certain characteristics that are called “matriarchal”. In no way do they validate the common misapprehension that women have the last word in matriarchies, or that they rule over others. No serious researcher has ever expressed anything like this. Instead, these prejudices reflect the unexamined assumption that matriarchal societies would be organised just like patriarchal ones, but with women, instead of men, in the central roles.

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“Conversations with the Goddess”, by Dorothy Atalla

This book is a surprise. It does not fulfil any expectations a reader might have – and this is a good thing. In hybrid ways and by an eclectic combination of personal spiritual encounters, visions of a Goddess past and a Goddess future, and theoretical critiques of texts dealing with the archetypal feminine in a psychological and evolutionary perspective, the book leads the readers to new approaches to the divine feminine.

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Re-Visioning Mythologies of Gender/Sex

“Gender” might be described as “one’s perception of oneself” as being either female or male, and “sex” as “the physical appearance of one’s body” as either female or male1. The “sex” of a body is commonly understood necessarily to be able to fall into one or the other designation, and if it does not then life, within many cultures, is almost certain to be traumatic for the being involved.

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“Goddess Matters: the mystical, practical and controversial”¸ by Judith Laura

This is a lucid, well-written and engaging book, and a timely one, bringing together many different aspects of the current Goddess movement and doing so in a way that encourages thought and discussion.  I thoroughly enjoyed the reading process and kept wanting to enter into conversation with Judith – to ask a question, agree or argue a point, or discuss further.

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Pythia’s Warning: Women’s Spirituality and the Oracular Tradition

When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one portion of the family of man to assume among the people of the earth a position different from that which they have hitherto occupied, but one to which the laws of nature and of nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes that impel them to such a course.
Do these words sound familiar?  American readers probably guess that it’s part of The Declaration of Independence.  European readers might think of Mary Wollstonecraft or another early feminist.

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Spiritual Highs and Lows

Many and varied are the ways we connect with spiritual experience; whether through meditation, ceremony, service, childbirth, lovemaking, sport, moments of wild wonder in nature, losing oneself in acts of creativity or simply whilst standing at the kitchen sink. We can also experience deep connection in times of pain, loss and extremis.

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My Church

My church has many doors. I open my front door and I am there. I access my place of worship from the door of a shop, door of my car, door of my neighbours’ house, my friends’ house, even the dentist has a door that leads out into my huge and beautiful church.

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