The Bone Flute

by Carolyn Lee Boyd

Cave with rose

Like a womb readying itself to give birth, the cave opened.  Victoria grabbed a tree to steady herself on the shaking Earth, the rocks tumbling away to reveal a small aperture near the ground. She stepped off the hiking path to peer in, drawn by the gaze of the mountain’s newly revealed eye.  Once her eyes became accustomed to the blackness, she travelled deep inside, mesmerized by the beasts painted on the walls seeming to move in her phone flashlight’s roving yellow beam.

She stumbled over a pile of bones then fell, grasping an object that came into her hand as she caught herself.  It was hollow, a bird’s bone, with holes in the top and  one end carved with swirls and lines.  She shook the dirt from inside the flute, for she realized that’s what it was, pressed it to her mouth and blew.  She heard only a muffled gasp.  She cleared more dirt then focused her breath until the flute sang one low, clear note.

But what about the human bones surrounding her?  She was not frightened, but rather comforted, as if she had discovered a lost sister or mother.  It did not occur to her that the bones were not female.  A few ornaments were scattered among them, but the body had not been laid out ceremoniously. This woman had simply laid down and died, Victoria thought.

When it was time to go, Victoria wrapped the flute in a crimson scarf hand-woven for her by her sister and tucked it into her backpack. She placed loose boulders across the mountain’s opening to hide it.  She was not sure if the woman within would have wanted to become a spectacle for archeologists and the media.

The flute lay wrapped in its shroud for three months before Victoria picked it up again. Her faith in her intuition that she was meant to play this invaluable relic had left her the moment she stepped out of the cave. Finally, one searing summer evening when the city was quiet, as if waiting for her to find her courage, she gingerly took the flute off the shelf.  If the woman in the cave had wanted her to find the flute, what did she want Victoria to play?

Continue reading "The Bone Flute"

Review: “The World Is Your Oracle: Divinatory Practices for Tapping Your Inner Wisdom and Getting the Answers You Need”, by Nancy Vedder-Shults

Reviewed by Carolyn Boyd

Nancy Vedder-Shults’s The World Is Your Oracle is a beautiful, insightful, and compassionate guide to “divination” — listening to the sacred voice within to bring into consciousness the wisdom your soul already possesses. Our modern world teaches us to ignore the tremendous understanding and knowledge we all have about ourselves and each other and about how we should live our lives. So, Nancy teaches us how to first bring our minds into a state that allows us to access all that is inside us, then to use various techniques to experience and interpret messages expressed in the soul’s language of symbols.

The heart of the book is instructional. First she explains how to prepare yourself to receive your answer by defining your question clearly, preparing your space, setting your intentions and asking for guidance, and grounding and centering. Then she offers step-by-step instructions on 40 different means of divination. Finally, she invites you to interpret what you have experienced. The divination techniques are divided into visual, auditory, and kinesthetic, or body-focused, methods and the reader is encouraged to determine which is most resonant for them, or try them all. The techniques range from ancient standbys, like dowsing and drumming, to more contemporary ones like balloon diagrams. Most need little or no special equipment, and some only use actions you do every day, like walking. Continue reading "Review: “The World Is Your Oracle: Divinatory Practices for Tapping Your Inner Wisdom and Getting the Answers You Need”, by Nancy Vedder-Shults"

The Sunset on the Mountain Is Really the Dawn

by Carolyn Lee Boyd

Broom

I was reborn on the mountain whose seasons I had loved for the fifty years of life I had lived so long ago. I knelt on its breast and breathed in the black, musky, fertile soil, tasted its bitter groundwater and sweet stream nectar, rubbed its skin into mine. Then, when I was ready, I washed it off my body, but not my soul, and walked into the village square whose sights and sounds I still remembered from 500 years before.

During my centuries as a spirit I had chosen to stay near where I had lived, still surrounded by those I had loved. The people had since turned to dust, but I could see their features in the faces of their great-great-grandchildren’s great-great-grandchildren. I sat with them, unseen, under the same trees, turned their eyes with my thoughts to the same herbs I had given their ancestors so many years ago to make them well, witnessed the wars and movements that came and went in the outside world and saw how they touched the village, and mourned and rejoiced with each new generation. Continue reading "The Sunset on the Mountain Is Really the Dawn"

Buying Pomegranates in Demeter’s Supermarket

by Carolyn Lee Boyd

pomegranateFor one glorious week each year, the rose and white-showered magnolia trees lining Main Street transformed the potholed, two-lane road into a processional as elegant in its own simple way as any gracing a medieval European or an ancient city. The town did festoon the street with flags and balloons for parades with the Mayor and town council, high school band, and Boy and Girl Scouts on special occasions. “But, it goes nowhere,” Mary reflected as she drove home on a Friday evening during that magnificent week one year, and, indeed, it ended in an empty concrete courtyard of buildings long since abandoned.

As the sun warmed her arm through the car window for the first time that spring, an unexpected memory came to her of summer Saturdays when she and her mother would gather in her grandmother’s kitchen to make jellies and jams from the fruits of her grandmother’s farm.  The thought “I’m almost the age my mother was then. She had my grandmother and me. How did I get to be so old and end up so alone?” came into Mary’s mind unbidden.

Tucked into a strip mall at the corner where Mary waited for a green light was Demeter’s Supermarket, a small grocery that had been established by Greek immigrants decades ago when the neighborhood was mostly families who had immigrated from there. Their children had moved out a generation ago, but a few of the original businesses still served the surviving elders. Continue reading "Buying Pomegranates in Demeter’s Supermarket"

Seeds on the Wind

by Carolyn Lee Boyd

EarthIn the garden of She Who Creates, tucked into a very remote corner, grows a small, water-blue planet whose inhabitants call it “Earth.” The soil is rich but most of what grows there appears on the surface to be only straggly stems fighting each other for a place near the dim light. But yet, somehow the most spectacular blooms emerge from the planet by the billions every day.

She Who Creates has planted Earth’s patch of the garden so that the breeze will catch its blossoms and carry them to the farthest reaches of all that is. “Like seeds on the wind,” she whispers as a cloud of them rises from the Earth to make their way across the cosmos.

Everyone elsewhere in the universe waits anxiously for Earth’s exquisite blossoms to drift for eons to come to their planet. When each one lands, it is enshrined and lovingly cared for, each drop of sap savored, every molecule doled out so that it will do the most good. Continue reading "Seeds on the Wind"