Secret Past Lives

by Atasha Fyfe

lute and roses

For many reading this, it will come as no surprise that modern-day feminists and followers of the Goddess often had past lives as priestesses in the ancient worlds. While many of those memories come from Egypt, Greece or Rome, they may also come from less obvious times and places.

At first glance, it seems that we know all about the last 2,000 years - the astrological Age of Pisces. Memories of lives in that time are sadly often about the persecution of women who tried to use their esoteric knowledge for the good of others.

These experiences may create traumas that are carried from one lifetime to the next. In modern times, this can create a baffling blockage when people – both men and women – decide to take up work that is in tune with their spiritual path. A traumatic unconscious memory may then act like some invisible force which keeps stopping them from making any progress on their new path.

Fortunately, becoming conscious of this issue and where it comes from is usually enough to dissolve the block. I go into this more fully in my article here.

However, there was another, hidden side to the Age of Pisces. Peeking behind the grey curtain of official history reveals a big surprise. There was a huge underground veneration of the feminine. Because it had to be kept secret, this was probably more widespread than we can ever know. It flowered especially well in what came to be called the Courts of Love. These were aristocratic strongholds such as chateaux, castles and great manor houses.

This extract from my book, Magic Past Lives, describes how that clandestine world operated, and the meaning of its mysterious codes and symbols. Some of this may ring a bell for you – if so, it’s a good sign that you may once have been a part of that world.

Extract from Magic Past Lives

Secret societies aren’t always officially organised groups. In medieval and Renaissance times, free-thinkers often belonged to a looser-knit community of people who understood one another through other kinds of secrecy. Outside the strict walls of Church dogma there frolicked a rich world of colourful codes and symbols.

Fairytales are full of them, expressing once unorthodox ideas in the form of stories. Sleeping Beauty was about finding your inner spirit. Jack and the Beanstalk dramatised the importance of following your heart. Beauty and the Beast showed the transformational power of love.

Colour coding was often central to these tales. The description of ‘cheeks pale as the snow, lips red as blood, and hair as black as the raven’s wing’ was really a sly reference to alchemy. These colours were about the stages of turning lead to gold – which itself was a secret metaphor for spiritual transformation.

The Tarot cards encoded huge volumes of secret esoteric teachings. The Church especially disliked the High Priestess card because it stood for female spiritual authority.

One of the biggest symbols of the time was the rose. It stood for secrecy, the spiritual path and love. Renaissance heretics turned love into a form of worship. They venerated the feminine, raising women above the lowly status the Church had dished out to them. In the courtly circles of high-born heretics, devotion to a particular lady became a form of religion.

An even riskier heresy grew from this: the celebration of erotic love as a spiritual path. But this was no hippie lovefest. An admirer had to get through a lot of noble deeds and pining before his lady even looked at him. Eventually she might favour him with her scarf, which was carefully colour coded. He’d then wear it in ways that sent silent messages to her about his love.

Troubadours, poets and story tellers of the time entertained the courts of Europe with tales and songs that were full of double meaning. They loaded their works with coded messages meant only for the cognoscenti.

One troubadour said of his poem: ‘Thou can’st go whither thou wilt. I have dressed thee so well that thou will be understood by those endowed with intelligence: of others thou need’st not be concerned.’

In all these ways the secret underground world developed a rich culture of signs, smokescreens and red herrings. This was called the Language of the Birds or the Green Language.

As a result, a cornucopia of vibrant symbols pours out from those times to now. For the many who belonged to that world, they whisper tales of colourful memories that are just waiting for rediscovery.

Atasha Fyfe

Atasha Fyfe has been a past life therapist for nearly 20 years, living in Glastonbury for most of that time. She is the author of Past Lives and Magic Past Lives, published by Hay House.
Information about past lives and regression is on her website. For articles about the magic and mysteries of life, have a look at her blogsite.
You’re welcome to join her mailing circle for occasional newsletters, find her on Twitter and Facebook, or contact her from this page on her website.

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