Issue 8, Autumn 2008

Goddess Pages - Issue 8 "Diana", by Gillian Booth

Diana, by Gillian Booth

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Articles & Fiction

by Karen Tate

Sekhmet, by Jeff Dahl -Open SourceWriting my current new book, Walking An Ancient Path: Rebirthing Goddess on Planet Earth, required that I look back over years of happiness, sadness, revelations, success, disappointment and patterns.  One of those patterns was my relationship with surrender and my belief in universal wisdom.

Surrender was not a concept I easily related to or thought much about.  Instead like so many others in denial about their illusion of control or with a penchant for perfectionism, I believed I staved off chaos and fear with organization, attention to detail and lists.  These tools help, of course, and lists made me feel safe.  I have daily lists, weekly lists, monthly and annual lists.  Nothing makes me feel better than an entire list with big fat red lines through all the things that have been completed.  And throwing a list away - everything finally complete - well, now that’s almost orgasmic!  But sometimes the best planning does not guarantee our perception of perfection, success or our vision of where we hoped things lead.

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by Susun S Weed

Diana, bronze, Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741-1828)

Artemis - Goddess of the herbalist - gives her name to a genus of marvelously aromatic, safely psychedelic, highly medicinal, dazzlingly decorative, and more-or-less edible plants in the Asteraceae family. I love Artemis, and I love her plants.

Who is Artemis?

Amazonian moon goddess. Goddess of the hunt. Goddess of the wild things. Goddess of the midwife. Goddess of the herbalist. Mother of all Creatures. Leader of the sacred bitches. Great she-bear. Diana. Selene. Ever Virgin; owned by no man. We will visit her sacred wood on a shamanic journey. Who knows what will happen then.

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by Karen Tate

The Goddess Kali, 1770, by Richard B. Godfrey (image believed to be out of copyright)

This article primarily addresses the political/cultural situation in the USA, but has a great deal of food for thought for all of us. (Editor) 

People turn to religion in times of chaos.  No doubt when St. Paul was run out of Ephesus, lucky to be alive after he tried to turn the masses away from their beloved Goddess Artemis, he must have had his doubts if Christianity would ever stick.  Likewise for St. Thomas in 72 CE when he saw an apparition of the Indian Goddess Kali in Calcutta, as he tried to convert the heathens.

If you lived and worshiped in Pagan Rome, you probably never thought you would see the day the empire would be dominated by Christians.  And if you were an early Christian, fearing for your life, you surely wondered what the future held.  In the nineteenth century it was debated if women had souls.  The United States allowed slavery. Women fighting for the vote in America were threatened with institutionalization and arrest for their activism and desire for equality.  And the thought of an African American or woman becoming President were unheard of.

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By André Zsigmond

The Good News

Fresh figsConcern from the Vatican about environmental issues has been in the news lately. The ‘seven deadly sins’ have been updated to include environmental pollution and during his American visit the Pope repeatedly spoke of his concerns about damage to the environment. In July, on his Australian tour, “his holiness” recycled his speech on this topic once more.

I am a little reluctant to welcome these comments from the Catholic Church, particularly as in the Bible the best publicised environmental vandalism - the deliberate and senseless destruction of a wild fig tree - was in fact perpetrated by Jesus himself. This is how authors of the Good Book report it in the Gospel of Mark (11;12-21):

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as told to Katara Moon

BautoHello Sweeties,
Baubo Biggins here.

I send this missive to you after being inspired by Karen Tate's lovely book Walking An Ancient Path. My memory was jogged and two tales of epiphany came spilling back which I have vowed to share with you one and all.

A bit of background must be indulged - how did Baubo Biggins become my alter ego, muse, guardian Goddess, et al?  "Oh", I hear you say, "She has taken her name from an adventure series known to millions".  But no ... you'd be wrong.  Baubo is a Goddess.  A Greek Goddess.  One who saved us all from freezing our asses off.

And Biggins?  Well Biggins speak for themselves. "Oh no", I hear you say, "She is going to make them talk".  But No. I thought about that briefly.  And well ... that would be tacky.  Even Baubo has certain standards.

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by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D.

Newgrange Triple SpiralThe Triple Spiral of ‘Newgrange’ – as the place is commonly known – in Ireland, is just one motif amongst a whole collection of art that represents the first major Western European art tradition since the Ice Age.1

The significance of this collection has been largely unrecognised, because its context of megalithic mounds spread over an area has not been understood. This complex art collection is engraved on stones throughout the large stone structures that are dated between 3200 and 3700 B.C.E. - which places these mounds among the world’s oldest remaining buildings2. The Triple Spiral then is an ancient highly abstract visual design, left by the ancestors of this place, in a context whose meaning is still being unravelled and contemplated.

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by Geraldine Charles

All this pitting of sex against sex, of quality against quality; all this claiming of superiority and imputing of inferiority belong to the private-school stage of human existence where there are sides, and it is necessary for one side to beat another side. (Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own, 1929)

Lady Justice overseeing the "Well of Justice" in Frankfurt.

“Yeah, but what about balance?” I’ve been asked that question many times, sometimes even stopped in the street or interrupted in the middle of a talk. The questioner no longer needs to explain what he – or occasionally she – means: a belief that it is wrong to work only with goddess, “excluding” the god.  Particularly since the Goddess Temple opened in Glastonbury I - and others - have been accused of riding roughshod over the concept of balance as A Good Thing, apparently involving nothing more strenuous than placing a token representation of any male deity in the Goddess Temple. I’d like to reach for my sword, symbol of air, of clarity and truth, and look at this idea of balance in some detail.

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By Theresa Curtis-Diggs

Whatever the inward darkness may have been to which the shamans of those caves descended in their trances, the same must lie within ourselves…. The beat of the shaman's drum may still be heard, transporting spirits in flight to regions known to our visionaries and to men and women gone mad.

(Joseph Campbell)

You know the day destroys the night
Night divides the day…

The gate is straight
Deep and wide

Break on through to the other side
Break on through to the other side
Break on through to the other side, yeah

(Jim Morrison) (read more...)


Poetry & Reviews

by Rachael Clyne

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by Jacqui Woodward-Smith

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By Caeia March

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By Maria Duncalf-Barber

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by Penn Kemp

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by Doreen Hopwood

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by Helen Carmichael

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By Doreen Hopwood

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by Helen Carmichael

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Reviewed by Sandra Román

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Reviewed by Miriam Raven

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