Issue 17, Summer 2011

Goddess Pages - Issue 17 "Flowing with Music", by Sanndi Art

Flowing with Music, by Sanndi Art

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Articles & Fiction

by Susun S Weed

linden teaAs we slide from summer into autumn, the sun seems hotter and fiercer than ever. And the summer's heat makes us thirsty. What shall we drink? There are so many choices. Since 2003 the number of new drink products on the market has tripled. How are we supposed to choose the best drinks? Does it even matter?

I think it does. The liquid portion of our diets is as important as the solid portion. That's why I drink herbal brews, nourishing herbal infusions to be exact, instead of juice or water. Some herbs are powerhouses of nourishment, energy, and health-promoting factors. By choosing those herbs as my drink, I increase the amount of protein, vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients in my diet without consuming extra calories, and at a cost of only pennies a day. I'd rather drink nourishing herbal infusions than any other beverages. I drink infusion in the morning, throughout the day, and in the evening, too. (read more...)

by Georgina Sirett-Hardie

Full Moons in July and August

Astro Clock, PragueThe July Full Moon is sitting in Capricorn, reflecting the Sun in Cancer, and is known as the Rose Moon or Moon of Claiming;  illuminating your authority and integrity . Cancer is the sign of the Mother and Capricorn the sign of the Father, so the spotlight is on feelings and family.

Capricorn Moon characteristics are self-control, prudence, ambition, patience, conservatism, responsibility, discipline and order. Impersonality and stinginess may appear in the manifestation of emotions, and sometimes a desire to isolate yourself. (read more...)

by Carolyn Hillyer

Moon in WaterThis book is written as a spiral that spins in both directions; stories gathered and hung upon a non-linear structure, memories and textures threaded around a circular loom, words spilled across the earth floor of an ancient sacred women’s house. Here are some fragments from the loom …

The Weaver’s Daughter and Other Yarns

She collected looms. The first was a rug loom, a simple frame bolted and braced and bound with twine, as tall as a tribes woman in her middle years and twice as wide. She came to this loom by chance or destiny or both. She had crept into the weavers’ monthly council because her fingers itched and twisted whenever she passed near their door and she wanted to know why. (read more...)

by Jan Foster-Bartlett

Loch ViewMy church has many doors. I open my front door and I am there. I access my place of worship from the door of a shop, door of my car, door of my neighbours’ house, my friends’ house, even the dentist has a door that leads out into my huge and beautiful church.

There are no medieval tiles on the floor but soft damp turf, sometimes shingle, pavement or scrubland. My favourite flooring is the crumbly soil mixed with leaf mould. The roof of my church goes on and up forever, blue with exquisite patterns painted in white, cream and grey. It changes colour constantly. There are times when it is black and dark and then it is illuminated with an array of sparkling jewels. (read more...)

by Peter Knight

West Kennet Long Barrow - photo by Peter KnightMagically standing on a ridge just south of Avebury, West Kennet Long Barrow is one of the most magnificent and oldest of Wiltshire’s ancient monuments. Archaeologist Aubrey Burl described the site as, ‘… the finest megalithic tomb in England and Wales…’ and as such it is included in the Avebury World Heritage Site.

It is the best preserved, and almost the longest, of all long barrows, comprising hundreds of tons of chalk and earth in a 100m long mound, plus a passage and five atmospheric chambers at the east end, guarded by large sarsen stones. The whole monument was designed to impress from the outside, and to transform once within. (read more...)

by Carolyn Lee Boyd

CauldronSummer is the season of truth. In New England, summer always begins when the sun melts the layer of snow that has given the illusion of our world as a unified and peaceful white landscape, revealing the artifacts of daily life dropped and covered over by each successive storm. The chocolate muffin that fell out of my pocket on the way to work, homework, make-up, keys and more all return and must be disposed of or reintegrated into our lives.

As I putter in my garden, pieces of 19th century broken dishes and bottles constantly rise and make their way into the top layer of shifting soil. These objects had been tossed out the back door by six generations of former occupants and are now coming back as reminders that our ecological misdeeds will always be found out. Beyond these seasonal metaphors for revelation, in summer many of us are outside and with others much of the time. We can see and be seen in the clear light of day for all we do and all we are. And so, I think summer is the perfect time to contemplate Cerridwen’s cauldron.  (read more...)

A Novel by Clarise Samuels

Chapter 7: The Feast

Brynhild with her sistersThe night after my arrival at my father’s palace, a great feast was held in my honor. It was quite something to behold by earthly standards. The grand hall was set with fifty long tables and benches, where fiddlers and jugglers walked up and down the aisles. The music was sweet and plaintive, and the guests did not know whether to get up and dance, or sit there and cry. The oak wood of the dining tables sagged under the weight of all the food continually being brought out by young maidens, who were quite beautiful by earthly standards. It was a regal display of abundance.

The air was filled with the scent of the endless variety of roasted meats, which had been chased, slaughtered, and hauled back to the royal kitchens by King Budli’s team of skilled and expert hunters. The serving girls delivered waves of enormous platters of cured tongue, boiled meat, boar’s head, large capons, roasted swans, herons, and other roasted birds covered with their feathers as if they had been taken directly from their down-coated nest. But this was not all—there was roasted piglet, turkey, rabbit, curlew, pheasant, venison, teal—every kind of savory flesh and fowl one could dream of. The exquisite delicacies served up for dessert included sugared dates, candied violets, fruit dumplings, fruit tarts, custards, pies, puddings, and apple and cheese fritters. Wine flowed as if it were from a spring whose waters were without end.

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 Poetry & Reviews

by Chrissy Heaven

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by Susan McCaslin

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by Elan Justice

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by Dora Wright

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by Dora Wright

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by Susan McCaslin

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by Annelinde Metzner

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by Doreen Hopwood

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by Annelinde Metzner

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by Annelinde Metzner

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by Doreen Hopwood

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Reviewed by Judith Laura

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Reviewed by Miriam Raven

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